Archive | Past Research

First evidence of fish larvae producing sounds

—  The acoustic ecology of marine fishes has traditionally focused on adults, while overlooking the early life history stages. Here we document the first acoustic recordings of pre-settlement stage fish larvae using gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus) as a model species. Through a combination of in situ and unprovoked laboratory recordings, we found that L. griseus […]

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Celestial Patterns in Marine Soundscapes

   ——-     Soundscape ecology is the study of the acoustic characteristics of habitats, and aims to discern contributions from biological and non-biological sound sources. Acoustic communication and orientation are important for both marine and terrestrial organisms, which underscores the need to identify salient cues within soundscapes. Here we investigated temporal patterns in coral reef soundscapes, […]

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Orientation behavior in fish larvae: a missing piece to Hjort’s critical period hypothesis:

——   The first project that I conducted for my PhD research was a modeling study. I developed a module to direct oriented swimming behavior in fish larvae, to use in conjunction with the Connectivity Modeling System, which is an individual-based biophysical model. We used a biased correlated random walk equation to generate larval orientation towards […]

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Rumbling in the benthos: acoustic ecology of the California mantis shrimp:

——-   The California mantis shrimp (Hemisquilla californiensis) lives in muddy burrows among the kelp forests of southern California. This species produces a low-frequency “rumble” through vibrations of muscles under the carapace. With my colleagues in the Patek Lab, I recorded many hours of these rumbles in the mantis shrimp’s natural environment, off the coast of […]

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Disentangling defense: the function of spiny lobster sounds:

—–   With my colleagues in the Patek Lab, we investigated the function of the “rasp” sounds generated by the California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus). This project was conducted in a marine sanctuary at Santa Catalina Island, California. The work was done at night because these lobsters are nocturnal. We recorded the acoustics and physical defense […]

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